From Adversity to Success Principals with Jim Kaspari E1 – Transcript

Janet Fish

Hi and welcome to the Breakaway Entrepreneur podcast, where we explore the entrepreneur mindset and the characters and traits that lead to success. I’m your host, Janet Fish. In this episode, we talk about how to go from adversity to success principles with coach Jim Kaspari. Jim is CEO of peak business coaching. He’s an international speaker and author. He retired a millionaire at age 44. He got hit hard in 2008 lost millions and he built it all back up again. Listen and learn how we did it. I hope you enjoyed our chat. So I’m here with my guests. Jim Kaspari, Coach Jim Kapari. Jim, how long have we known each other? Like, 15 years we’ve known each other a super, super, long time. So I just want to start out because I know you well. I’ve had the pleasure of knowing you for so long. I want my listeners to know a little bit about you. So tell me a little bit about what you love to do. Tell me a little bit about your business. Kind of give us some background on you.

Jim Kaspari

All right. I’m not gonna go into my whole childhood history. but I

Janet Fish

got an hour or four hours. So why don’t you start there? 

Jim Kaspari

I’m passionate about but entrepreneurialism, And that’s why it’s such an honor to be on your show. The Breakaway Entrepreneur I I love, uh, call it American Dream, but could be any country but having financial freedom, having time, freedom, having geographical freedom, you know, whatever it is that people want. And, you know, it’s not as easy as people may think to be an entrepreneur to start a business and not just start a business, but to succeed. You know, a lot of people have heard the statistics. Nine out of 10 businesses fail in three years, and so it’s helping entrepreneurs. Is is a complex puzzle, and it takes it takes, you know, everything I have and it takes everything they have, you know, to really go for it. So I’m passionate about that. I was. I’ve also been on ski patrol for 20 years, and I just retired retired from that last year. So now I’m skiing for free without having to work. Um, and that was a great adventure. Great people. I also love climbing mountains. So thus I have a business  Peak and Summit business marketing. Peak and Summit are related to that. My sports passion is long distance running so anywhere from 10 K to marathon and maybe a little bit of ultra distance running. So most people think running is crazy unless there’s a fire. But I But I like it. And then the last thing is, I love playing music and I played in a band played in public, and that was something I never thought I would do. And I guess I guess you know, our relationship. We’ve we’ve supported each other as accountability partners. You know, we’re both coaches and we’ve seen each other learn and grow on do things we never thought was possible. And it’s just fun helping other people do that.

Janet Fish

It’s been really, really great to be able to do that all these years. So tell me a little bit about how you got into coaching because, interestingly enough, you and I kind of started our coaching career along the same time, taking that grueling course, we had to break boards and oh, right, that that was so cool thing. I sweat for three days and I never did but kind of tell me why you got into it and then because it is hard. And that’s one of the reasons I wanted to do this podcast is because I think people think it’s a an overnight thing, an easy thing to do. So I really want to drill down into how overcome those challenges and and how to work through that. But just what made you say hey, because you like I were ex corporate people? So what did you say? OK, it’s time to move from that world into the world of being an entrepreneur.

Jim Kaspari

Yeah, great question. I think it’s interesting story. I worked for Genentech for 20 years. I had a degree in biological sciences from UC Davis and started in manufacturing and was fortunate enough to move over to chemical engineering process development. And, um, I didn’t study chemical engineering in college. So in evenings I studied. I studied the textbooks and and I I had I had mentors and, you know, my bosses and other people on the team that guided me through that ended up having ah very successful career retired a millionaire at age 44 you and I met you a month after that. Now the interesting thing,  wasn’t that that I had this career and was able to retire, but how? I was able to retire in the last couple of years of my career. I started real estate investing and and other types of investing through that. And we even had a club that met on Friday evenings after work. And we would talk about investments and due diligence and how to diversify and real estate investing. And and, uh, we would read books like Napoleon Hill’s Thinking Grow Rich or Robert Kiyosaki is Rich Dad, Poor Dad And that when I read those two books, I was like, You know, holy bejeezus Um, anything is possible. And it did happen that at the time right before I retired, I was leading a team of 20 internal consultants and we were doing a six Sigma like rational thought process, decision making, root cause analysis and these this team was making the company’s saving the company tens of millions of dollars, and I got a 3% raise that year, and it was really I’m I firmly believe it was due to the HR calculations and many of us fall victim to that, no matter how hard are effectively, we work. But in the entrepreneurial world, if you work harder, more effectively, work smarter, get team, get products leverage. Then the sky’s the limit. Their you know, your raises dependent on you. And the other thing that made me want to convert over to entrepreneurialism was when I was a kid. I remember doing yard work or painting houses or even baby sitting and thinking, God, you know, making five bucks an hour. I could I could hire my friends at three bucks an hour

Janet Fish

that thought right, and that’s,

Jim Kaspari

you know, normal standard business practice, and I didn’t know it at the time. But then you go through the education process and they basically teach you skills to be, you know, quote a slave to to the big companies. Even MBA programs are designed to have you be in middle or upper management and I mean you can definitely join the C suites, but it’s not not necessary. There are entrepreneurial programs, but a lot of the programs are Are, you know, teach you to be in the machine, work till you’re 65 then retire and I didn’t want to wait till I was old to play and have fun,

Janet Fish

smart move to make things. So I want to kind of get into what drives you. And so I know you know you well enough to know two things one is that I’m gonna maybe make you choose. But maybe not, um, one of them is your desire to help people. I mean, we’re both business coaches, that that’s what we do, that’s what drives us. And then there’s the freedom, freedom to play and do all the things that we d’oh. So if you had to choose one, well, it’s really hard question. But if you had to choose one or what really drives you at the end of the day, maybe you don’t have to choose one. But what really drives you?

Jim Kaspari

Gosh, I I absolutely love freedom, love, flexibility and free time. And, you know, if I if I schedule it and feel like it, I could go for a three hour bike ride and, you know, in the afternoon on a quote workday, um, I can also work till midnight on a special project, but what really lights me up is a coaching client or, you know, a Web design online marketing client having an ah ha moment or sending me an email saying, Oh, my God. That one tip you gave me, save me 1000 bucks on her, you know, made me $10,000. And that’s thus where I get the most joy, like freedom and going for a bike ride or, you know, whatever is is great. And it’s nice to have a balanced life, but I honestly get giddy. And sometimes I get more excited.

Janet Fish

My clients I know that feeling. Yeah. Yeah. So if

Jim Kaspari

I was gonna choose, it would be helping people

Janet Fish

Got it. I feel the same way, because I want to help people. All the rest of it comes. So was it when you retired at 44 as a millionaire? Was that the moment that you felt like I’ve made it, or was that just the beginning off, or is it a constant? I’m making it. I’m making it up, making it mean When did you know or do you know yet?

Jim Kaspari

Uh, I thought I made it. And an interestingly um, I want it. You know, my net worth was just a little bit over $1 million. And nowadays of you invest that at 5% you know, that’s what, $25,000, no that’s 50,000 year. And it’s hard to live off that in California. So I hadn’t made it. And s o I was continuing to invest in helping people start companies. And 2009 as many people remember, was pretty bad economy and pretty bad real estate market. And I ended up losing almost two million. So I had to dig out of that hole. So, um, I would say I’m out. I’m well out of the hole. But I’m not not to where I want to be. And, you know, years have gone by since then, and at first I I I felt like a failure. It was really tough. And now what I love I love forward progress. I love growth. I love chain not chained. Not just change for change, but evolution, personal growth, professional growth. Um, you know, breaking through different barriers as far as as income or or building team and being able to help people in different ways. So, um and we could look at the corporate wheel as running on a running along on a hamster wheel and then as an entrepreneur, as as business owners and by helping people and developing and growing as as we help other people. You take that hamster wheel off the little rack, right, and then you put it down on the ground and it rolls forward. It’s the forward progress that I like.

Janet Fish

Absolutely, I I also experienced in 2008 my projects collapsed and I didn’t lose a ton ton of money. But my opportunity upside opportunity still hasn’t come back for the real estate deal that I was doing at the time. You could have so that it’s so 2005 you become an entrepreneur in 2009 That’s this is when that happens. That’s only 3 or 4 years. So you could have said, I’m gonna go back and get a job. Yeah, but you didn’t. And so I want to explore because this is goes to the key of my conversations in this podcast, which is what are the traits that make us different as entrepreneurs because both of us were corporate people. For many many years were very successful. And then we quit that or whatever happened that we come out, become entrepreneurs, we have to have those traits or we have to grow those traits. So I want to just talk a little bit about that. What you see as the traits that make entrepreneurs different than not that there’s anything wrong with W two job, but you have to be a different human. You have to be a different human, too, have a $1,000,000 lose a $1,000,000 or two, and climb back out of that hole and still and still continue to be successful. Yeah, I’d love to explore your thoughts on that.

Jim Kaspari

Yeah, And like I said, that was, uh, for my ego. It was a tough emotional time. I mean, financially do right. And I’ll tell a brief story during that tough time, you know, digging out of ah, negative net worth hole, you know? So having having not just nothing to start businesses with, um, but negative nothing and, you know, having expenses that were beyond my income. It was a tough situation, and it it was tempting to go look for a job and I considered that option. And at that point in my life, um, I felt like I was out of jail and I didn’t want to go back. Um, although 11 during one particularly tough time, I had a dream, and it was one of those vivid, super real dreams. And I was running through the halls of Genentech and I was yelling out at the office mates, cubicle mates and just saying, you know, genetic pays for your lights, pays for your computer, pay for this table, these chairs If you go to a meeting, they pay for sandwiches or cookies. And and I woke up and as you know, I sweat and and, uh and as I go going through a rough time and and I don’t know, I do know what it is, is it’s Ah, it’s the dream. It’s of the passion. But it’s also creative persistence. And I’m gonna say that again. Creative persistence. You know, you’re not gonna hit it. I wasn’t hitting my head against the tree over and over and over. I was like, Okay, Can this work? Who? Who could give me some advice? Who could help me? Um, you know how can I do this differently? You know, instead of water hitting a rock in the stream and it flows around it, right. So I remind people of that all the time, and the other thing is being open minded. And then what goes with that is getting out of your comfort zone. And the word I use for that’s courage doesn’t mean I’m not without fear. But it means I feel the fear and do it anyway. You know, whether it’s reaching out to potential clients or mentors or whatever it is. I tell people do something scary every day.

Janet Fish

So that’s interesting because you know Keaton. Yeah, so a friend of ours and we’re having a conversation And he was talking about some things that were challenging and scary and all that. And I said, Just be bold one minute a day and so any second really like that and said He called me. He’s like, Can I use that? Just be bold one minute today, but I thought it was great because we as entrepreneurs, I mean, certainly persistence and consistency and all of that, Um, but it is overcoming the fear, and it is just going and doing it when everything in your body tells you you shouldn’t do it. Yeah, and so here’s the other thing. And I rely on you a lot as a accountability partner or someone that I call when I’m sitting in my office and I’m like, I don’t want to work today. I really need to get this project done. I don’t want to do it and I’ll call you and say I’m going to do it. And on Friday we’ll talk. So talk a little bit about the mentors and accountability partners and the people that you’ve had in your life because I think for both of us at that time we got we got involved with an entrepreneurial group. We weren’t hanging out with W-2 people were hanging out with entrepreneurs, and for me, that was critical in me, even understanding that I could be an entrepreneur. So how off, like mentors and accountability partners, and those kind of things really affected you as you’re going through that rough time And then in all of your time,

Jim Kaspari

Yeah, well, you mentioned the intensive coach training that we went through and how I mean, these were deep exercises and scary and were put on the spot in front of other people. So we we went through that training the next year we went through additional training. Um, and we were encouraged to come up with the mastermind team. Now, this group of coaches were selected out of, you know, hundreds of people. And so these were, like the top performers, the smartest, the people that had fruit on the tree, people that had results. And I just, you know, speaking about courage, I just said, Who am I most afraid to ask, Like, who would I feel like? Oh, they wouldn’t. They wouldn’t have a mastermind group with me. And and it was Bob Shaw and Succoro l and another woman, I I don’t remember her name right now, but these Siccoro was one of the fastest millionaires in real estate in less than in less than a year. Um, you know, Bob went to Harvard and managed 200 properties out in New York, and this other woman did commercial real estate, and I asked five people in four of them said yes, and I’m blown away constantly by this courage. You know what? What’s the you know what’s gonna get you the results that you want And then also kind of what’s a what’s above that level? You know, when I, um when I did ski patrol, there was, ah, resort that I won’t name. It was a kind of smaller resort and not as steep a sugar bowl. My buddy and I went and tried out there for ski patrol and we got accepted. And so I was like, Oh, I’m not not that great. As a skier I’m like advanced, intermediate or barely advanced. And I’m like, Well, where would I really like to do Ski patrol? And and I knew I knew that like Squaw Valley was too intense for me. But Sugar Bowl has has Steeps. And anyway, I went to the next level and tried out there and, like I said, ended up doing that for 20 years. But courage, the the phrase that I love for 2020. So Nike says, Just do it right. But sometimes when we think about doing it, we think about everything we think about the repercussions we think about how long it’ll take, how much work it is. So my statement for 2020 is just start. Don’t worry about all that other stuff just

Janet Fish

just start

Jim Kaspari

its I’m amazed when I just start something that’s been haunting me. A couple hours later. I’m like, Done,

Janet Fish

Yeah, it’s like you don’t want to go to the gym. I’ll just go right out for one minute. Yeah, exactly. There. Take a song that I like that though that’s really that’s really, really good. So talk about you alluded to it a little bit earlier about hiring team. I know that something you do when you’ve done a really good job of and it’s an evolving thing because we all know how easy it is to hire people and keep them. So talk a little bit about how your journey with that of hiring people and getting people working under you, getting the guy to mow the lawn for three bucks 

Jim Kaspari

actually never did that, but the thought told me I was entrepreneur. I’m gonna start with how most people hire people and most people hire people just based on an initial feeling or they written. They wait until they’re so they will they lose somebody, and it’s you know their business is just jam packed with clients, and they’re super busy. And so they do the bare minimum to hire someone, um, or somebody’s first time, and they don’t know exactly what they’re doing. And they put up an ad and they look at other people’s ads, which 910 people’s ads for employment suck. And then they get a bunch of people. They’re overwhelmed. The interview a few. And then they just pick one. Um, so, gosh, I have have a whole article and a whole hour long presentation on  how to find green employees, but I can summarize the process in a few a few semi simple steps. The first step is knowing that you can find exactly what you want. You know, there’s been times in my business where I could only afford a certain amount per hour. I could only pay for a certain amount of hours per week, and I needed somebody highly competent in in my online marketing business. I need people that are both left brain analytical and technical and right brain creative marketing. You know, they can come up with marketing copy and then build the website and plug it in. They’re also heart based. They love to serve and and they’re connected with their gut or intuition. So those were the kind of people that I look for, and in that how, like one woman I hired had a master’s degree and user generated content. Her husband made more than enough money to pay all their bills, and she just wanted work to do, and she wanted to learn from me. So that was an additional bonus. So it it meant my payment requirements, the our requirements. And she was flexible to do more hours. Like if you wrote that down on paper, you’d be like I could never find a person like that. But by step one is believing that you could find exactly what you want. Step two is not tolerating or compromising mediocrity. Anything below exactly what you want. I would say it’s like dating or marriage, right? And then the third step is getting a really clear job description. You know what are the must? What are the wants? What’s the experience? What’s the aptitudes? What what are the skills, the level experience, et cetera. So that’s that’s pretty obvious, but But, you know, I encourage people to do that really thoroughly. Then, um, is it okay if I go into the the ad model? Because that that’s really the crux and it follows us fairly. You know, the marketing centric model. So you want a headline that grabs their attention and makes it sound fun and special And relevant to what they’re doing. So instead of admin assistant needed, you know, you’d be like executive administration growth opportunity, right? So it’s for four words, but, you know, grabs people’s attention and then, you know, the first paragraph is just a general description. Letting them know they’re in the right places is the right job for them. The second paragraph is just flowers and unicorns and fairies like all What’s it, what’s in it for them, how wonderful the job is. And then the third paragraph is where you scare away the mediocre people. So it’s I call it brass tacks. You know, I’m a hard ass boss. I’ve been expecting to be on time or early attention to detail. You’re representing our company on and on and make the job sound harder than it actually is. And that that stops you from interviewing the wrong people and then just a Really. I call it a call to action with a hurdle. So submit your resume via email and and a cover letter explaining why you’re the best person to represent our company and in the body of the email, tell me your favorite hobby. So a little addition like that shows you who’s paying attention, who’s painted it in the details who follows up who follows instructions. And you can eliminate. You know, let’s say you get 50. Applicants probably can eliminate half of them with that one little question. So I love I love that model. And then, of course, you’re musts and your high wants from the job description. You come up with interview questions, and a lot of people don’t write down their interview questions, so they don’t always cover the most important things. And and each interview isn’t consistent. So writing down interview questions, having him open ended situational and actually, you know, having a probationary your test period. So those air the steps that I found help people find great employees

Janet Fish

that that’s all awesome. Can we put a link to that article on the show notes?

Jim Kaspari

Oh, absolutely. The show notes. Yeah, I don’t know that. I’ll mention it really quickly. If people wanna navigate there now, um, go to peak business coaching dot com That’s spelled P e A K Peak business coaching dot com goto articles. And then there’s a subcategory called leadership, and it’s one of the three articles. They’re

Janet Fish

all right, great, but well composed. A. Yeah, I do it in the in the show notes. So we’ve talked about, um, some of the hurdles and some of the challenges that you have, but I want to get a little more. I don’t know whether whether it’s granular are the opposite of that, but we all have challenges every day. I mean, we’ve talked about the big challenge of, you know, I lost much money in 2008 like a lot of us did. How did I come out of that hole? But I find it. I’m sure you have a swell coaching as many people as we have. There’s those daily challenges of, you know, how do you get out of bed? How do you get through the day when you’re not making enough money to hire anybody? Just what are those? What are some of those challenges that you’ve encountered or urine clients have encountered. And then what do you do to kind of overcome them?

Jim Kaspari

The you name in life is gonna throw us challenges. So, um, no matter how much spiritually practice or gratitude journal oh, are writing down affirmations that we do. So there’s a lot of tools that help us stay in a positive frame of mind. But what I found is life throws me ups and it throws me down. And something I’ve been really working on is how can I choose my mood regardless of what’s happening? Yeah, and the body that I think for me, the first thing is not to take it personally or not to blame God

Janet Fish

or, you know, like, yeah, exactly.

Jim Kaspari

So I can get into my little pity party for a little while. I just find it so important to find ways to choose my mood and to remember that I have a choice in those tough moments, you know, like we’ve been talking about. I just had my bank account fraudulently attacked and my identify identity stolen and money taken. And it’s it’s been tough, you know, financially, but it’s also tough, because I have to spend all this time with bank of, uh I won’t mention the name of the bank.

Janet Fish

Think, um, somewhere way right, right. Not that, um, And then my I

Jim Kaspari

d guys and and buy a new computer and and, you know, you got to do what you gotta do and those those aren’t billable hours. And And I lost money so I could let it. I did let it frustrate me for a bid, but then I look at gratitude, like a labeled so you can’t You can’t be feeling down and sorry for yourself when you’re feeling gratitude. So I have a gratitude journal that I write in almost every day. All right, Five unique things, you know, they’re not always unique, but I try to think of different things and to be grateful for, um, the other thing is as simple as breathing a few times and then smiling like smiling is amazing. And it’s so easy to do. And no matter what’s going on, you can smile. It’s okay. It doesn’t mean you agree with what happened. So acceptance is another big tool. Except what happened. It doesn’t mean you can agree with it doesn’t mean you condone the other person’s behavior. But it’s like, Okay, that happened, What am I going to do about it? And then the other thing that may be counterintuitive is reaching out to someone else. You know, I have, ah, cousin who’s going through cancer treatment right now. I can call her and get out of my little person. You know, this will be taken care of. This will be dealt with. And, you know, when you’re dealing with life and death and and there’s lots of people that might be having a tough day or just checking on a friend. So it’s getting out of myself getting out of my ego and pity party, those air, those air, some of the tools.

Janet Fish

That’s awesome. Yeah, so let me switch gears a little bit. Talk about intuition. Mmm. So how does intuition? Because I know you’ve got awesome intuition, and we’ve talked about it, because when we ignore our intuition, we sometimes that I knew that. Right? So what role does intuition kind of play in your decision making and and and even your coaching, right? Yeah. It’s such a huge part of that

Jim Kaspari

It’s so powerful and and I would see if anybody wants to grow in the area of intuition. I didn’t start as I think, as a child. I was highly intuitive and I didn’t know it. I was also in path. I could feel other people’s emotions and feelings, and it was very confusing to me because I’m like, Why am I feeling this? I know and ah, and now I’ve learned to govern it. But, um, by law, I feel like I lost my intuition because a lot of my life I was driven by insecurities and driven by material success, whether it was making money or doing fantastic in sports or being handsome or, you know, wearing the right clothes or whatever. Ah, being the best ski patroller, you know, um and so letting, learning to let my ego go, think that’s not what it’s about. It’s about, you know, going from my head to my heart or had to gut with intuition. And I know many of us have dated someone where we got these red flags at the beginning, and it wasn’t like a logical thing. It was just kind of came to us, so that’s a good example of things that that was a strong intuition, that I ignored

Janet Fish

it. And then it came back to bite me. And so listening. And the other thing

Jim Kaspari

about intuition is it’s a quiet voice. It’s a very calm, quiet voice, and it may be persistent. You might hear it two or three times. And if you hear that quiet voice speaking to you two or three times, take action immediately. Drop everything just taken. Just go for it. So we all have it. And and one thing that I was taught in coach training was to develop intuition. And so it could be called blurting. Or it could be called saying, What’s so different coach trainings. But so I would say to my client, Hey, this idea just popped in my head. I’m gonna share it with you. What do you think? And sometimes would be like? Nah. And then sometimes I’d be like, Oh, my God, how did you know that? And so I just continually tested through communication by and then trusting what is flowing through my head. Let me sound crazy. Um, the other thing is, is to be spiritually connected, and it doesn’t matter what your religious preferences. But but I believe there is a power higher than ourselves because I get these ideas that flow through me that sometimes I’m talking to a client in the ideal flow through me. I’ll share it instantly, and then I’ll be like, Holy crap, I gotta write that down. That’s a great idea. I don’t know where it came from, so I’m a big believer in it. Um, I think women are jen in generally better than than men added. And ah, Anyway, I think that’s a fantastic question. In a wonderful skill it can help you with your Children are gonna be with your mate, your friends, co workers.

Janet Fish

Yeah, so one of the things that I took from one of the books that we read when we were going to coach’s training and all of that was the idea of third level listening, right? And really, you know, first level is I hear the words that you’re saying, you know, second level is I understand the words that you’re saying. Third level is I’m hearing what you’re not saying. I think his coaches, especially for me I mean, I’ve coached over the phone. I can’t see your face, so I’m missing that. But I can hear things over the phone and I do the same time. You have the permission to talk to you about what’s coming up. So I think we as coaches have honed that. But I think anyone who’s in business would be better off served, listening more and then third level listening really into what you’re not saying not what you’re actually saying.

Jim Kaspari

And I think what we do is we feel the intuition, you know, like, say somebody somebody says the words Oh, yeah, I’ll do that.

Janet Fish

You can tell they don’t want to do it. And

Jim Kaspari

what we don’t do oftentimes in public situations is where you don’t have permission. Um, is just to say, Hey, it sounds like you’re not totally bought into this. Do you want to talk about it some more? Yeah, right. So that’s a really compassionate answer. And people are like, Wow, they really listen to me.

Janet Fish

And that’s not a challenge. You know what? The slacker, you know, do it. No,

Jim Kaspari

you just answer with curiosity. Yeah,

Janet Fish

not like this is a great day. It sounds like you want to do that you’re a team player. So let’s say this is something that you do a excellent job of. And I’ve always admired you for talk about how you ensure you have balance in your life. Uh, I

Jim Kaspari

don’t know, but I’ve always had

Janet Fish

a I had a good job. Maybe you don’t succeed at it every day, but I know that that’s a big push of yours. Is the freedom in the balance and freedom isn’t always unbalanced doesn’t equal freedom and and vice versa. But you do a good job of concentrating on. I need to have balance. Yeah, yeah. Talk a little bit more about how you do that and then what it means to you to have that balance in your life.

Jim Kaspari

Well, the first thing is, is knowing what lights you up, And so so I could be working and having balance because I’m bringing joy and satisfaction to my life because I’m doing something that I love. And outside of work, we should have things that we love. And, you know, I could be a pretty driven and focused person and and persistent, creatively persistent. And, uh, I actually make lists of things that I’d like to do for fun and and then I sounds driven, but I probably prioritize them. And the message that keeps coming to me is that I listen to my body, you know, like I know when I’m done and and I think the corporate world should have nap time for adults should have recess like we’re not made to go, Go, go all the time and the thing that’s blown me away with this, you know, balanced principle is I might go for a run at lunchtime down by the river on these beautiful trails and come up with an answer for myself for a client that I wouldn’t have thought of if I was just sitting in my desk on my computer. Chicken emails are whatever and so balance, whether I’m playing music O r or meditating, for that matter. Um, sometimes it makes us more productive and getting away from work. Whether an entrepreneur in the corporate world,

Janet Fish

Well, what I love refreshes us. Yeah, absolutely. And what I loved about what you said is the concept of balance doesn’t mean you know I’m working or I’m playing balance can be the total immersion in a coaching client or in a work situation that brings you joy. I mean, that’s I’ve always hated the idea. And when I was in corporate America hated the idea of, you know, work was supposed to be, you know, bad. You work from 9 to 5, and then you can’t wait to get out. You know, the beautiful thing about what we do is while it’s hard at times, helping people is just the most amazing feeling.

Jim Kaspari

Yeah, And speaking of balance, you know, where entrepreneurs we get to work half time, seven days a week, 12 hours a

Janet Fish

day. I know. So that brings me to, uh, what’s your favorite quote? But maybe that was it. No, that’s not my favorite quote. Definitely. Stay

Jim Kaspari

away from that. But what did would also came to minors. Um, you know, what I have observed in my clients and myself is you know, we get joy out of figuring things out ourselves. We get joy out of doing the work ourselves, and we don’t think other people can do the work as well as we can. So it kind of goes back to the hiring principle and leverage of business and delegation. So um, life can really suck as an entrepreneur if you’re doing too much yourself. So getting team, even his part time team can be really helpful there. So we have to We have to do what it takes. Then we have to work smart in order to get the balance. And then sometimes we have to put ourselves first. So, you know, it could be either principal

Janet Fish

now. And I’ve always said putting yourself first part and what I’ve told a lot of clients, like, you know, I go to the gym five days a week, six days a week, and I prioritize that I put it in my calendar. Um, and I know you set aside time to do take care of you. And I always think about it as I’m the most important employees in the company. Yes, I’m off oftentimes the only, um, and me taking care of me. If there’s not me, then there’s nobody to do the work. Right. So, um, I think about my going to the gym as my most important appointment of the day because if I’m not healthy and I’m not taking good care of myself, then I can’t serve others and I can’t do my job. Yeah, and I just think it’s like in corporate America. I hated the idea that they were like, You need to work harder. No, you were smarter care of yourself. And I always thought that was just such an important thing. And

Jim Kaspari

Americans are not very good at that. We don’t take I know people that, like, hundreds of days of vacation saved and, you know, go to Europe and do what they do,

Janet Fish

right? Take all summer off. So do you have any given us some great ideas? And I love the idea about helping people hire and rely on other people too. . Do you have any particular Apps or software or anything that you use that it’s really helped you with your, um, you’re effectiveness. Your productivity is gonna say profitability. That productivity is fine. The word I’m looking for

Jim Kaspari

Well, ahem. I have proprietary software I use for, like, SEO and optimization. But, you know, I I’m a visual kinesthetic guy, so I still I use I use my computer calendar, my phone calendar, But I have a paper planner and I map out. So you know, you and I have worked together to map out, you know, do a summit of evaluation of the last year. The last decade What our lessons learned setting goals for the next 2 to 5 years breaking that down into Okay, what are we gonna do here in 2020 and then spread that out over the months and then break up? Okay, These this is what I’m gonna get done in January. Now, this is what I’m gonna get done in February and then break that down into my weekly actions on DS and for me, the having it spread out and and having my schedule visible to me, I can so I can coat. I can schedule clients back to back. So if I want to work on a more complex, like creating a Prada information product or somebody working on somebody’s website, I have blocks of hours of time, and then then I have coaching time where I’m just boom, I’m in that zone. Yeah, I don’t particularly have any software, but, you know, I’m sure there are other people have different press preferences. And then

Janet Fish

I I know you’re a meticulous planner. So, um, so I have always envied that in you. So then my last question is, what do you want your legacy to be?

Jim Kaspari

Create creating a team, creating information, products? Um, that that are evergreen. They’re they’re timeless. You know, I’m I’m a stud ear of success principles. Whether it’s athletics or music or business, you know, what are the common pitfalls and most leads? It’s It’s our ego that gets in the way. Um and but there’s common pitfalls, like doing too much work yourself or or times get tight in people dropped their marketing budget like that’s a sure way to commit an entrepreneurial suicide. Um, you know, So there’s there’s probably, you know, 10 very, very common pitfalls that we can avoid. And then there’s There’s probably 10 handled 10 success principles, and so I’m capturing those. I’m distilling them. And just over the decades of experience, I wantto I want to turn decades in two days for people. And I think I just stole that from Tony Romans or Dean Grazioso or somebody but, um, but all the great books that I’ve read, you know, aren’t aren’t the little paperbacks that people are putting on Amazon. There’s nothing wrong with that. But they’re not necessarily taking decades of experience and distilling it to the Nuggets. I don’t really help people. So I want to leave information that will help people for, you know, long beyond the time I’m gone. The other thing is, if you know if something happens to me or if I die, I don’t want to be a burden. So having no will, having a trust, having having, ah, you know, my properties or whatever investments I have be easily hand handed over and manageable. Um, you know, I think those air

Janet Fish

those are good things. Yeah. So is there anything on your horizon that you want to talk about? About maybe a book coming out Are anything like that Something you want to leave us? Leave our listeners with or any way to get hold of you? Any special offer you might have? Yeah, I

Jim Kaspari

have. I have a book coming out early. 2020. It’s called Gold Medal Business Marketing. And speaking of, you know, taking decades in two days, I have taken the success principles for small business marketing, broken it up into 10 chapters, and then and I wrote that content actually over a year ago, and the little voice in my head was saying, Well, does the world really need another? You know, small business marketing book. There’s a bazillion amount there and that, you know, may not have been the most productive voice. But it helped me think about how can I make this book unique? Special. And some of my favorite clients are athletes because they understand the value of coaching. They don’t they know that this isn’t a quick fix, you know, just like athleticism. It takes it, takes diet. It takes nutrition and takes arrested, take stretching and takes massage like you name it and you know, to be top of your game. Whether your Olympic athlete, pro athlete, you are a pro business person. Um, so I wanted it to appeal to the athletic minded entrepreneurs, and by that I mean, they’re willing, do what it takes to succeed and And I I said, Well, I’ll call it Gold Medal business marketing. And then I got the idea of interviewing Olympic medalists and, you know, much against my fear. I had the courage and I just kept reaching out and reaching out, reaching out. You

Janet Fish

tell us a good story about that. 

Jim Kaspari

Okay, Well, one of my favorite, um, quests was there’s a guy that lives in this area named Bill Billy Mills. He was in the 1964 Olympics, and he won the gold medal in the 10,000 meters track and field. Um, Native American. And he went through a really tough times and has an amazing story. And And if you watched the video of the race, look for Billy Mills 1964 10,000 meters and you’ll see the last two minutes of that race, and it’s it’s phenomenal. So ah, mentor mind said, Oh, you know E was asking him because he’s been a coach for many years and in track and field and asked him for leads. I also asked, you know, surgeons that that work on the 40 Niners and I just reached out to everybody I possibly could. But But Billy I looked him up online, and he has a foundation, and I found a phone number and I called the phone number, and I think I left messages for three weeks in a row. Nothing pretty much

Janet Fish

and and then I

Jim Kaspari

finally got a hold of his wife, who’s the gatekeeper. And, you know, he’s very busy flies all over the country 300 days a year. He’s helping with Native Americans and with his foundation, does fantastic work. It’s really inspirational. And she’s just like, No, you can’t have an interview with him And he’s very busy And, um, you know, I’m sorry. And I said, Well, you know, I’ve been an athlete, a runner my whole life. I trained for the Olympic trials for 10 years, and you know, please, all I want is just 1/2 hour. It could be on the phone. Please, Please, please. And she’s like, Well, let me think. Let me talk to him. Let me think about it. So I called back the next week and bugged her again. And then the next week, and then finally, they’re tired. They’re like, this is more than 1/2 hour just talking this guy on the phone,

Janet Fish

just, you know, So

Jim Kaspari

I had the the loveliest two and 1/2 hour interview with him. You know, we we I came in and I was I honored the half hour, and, um,

Janet Fish

this is a face to face 

Jim Kaspari

face to face. And it was just amazing honor. And I’ll be stairs sharing that story in my book. So I’m leaving. You know, I interviewed 12 different Olympic athletes, and I’m leaving their success principles into each chapter of the book.

Janet Fish

I can’t wait to read them. Yeah, All right. So we’ll put some information on that as it’s coming. Yes, absolutely awesome. Well, Jim, thank you so much. It really And you can see a

Jim Kaspari

preview of it at peak business. Coaching dot com forward slash book.

Janet Fish

Okay, so I will. I’ll also put that link in the in the show notes. Thank you so much. You’re just Well, you know, we’ve been friends forever. Yeah. And you just mean so much to me. So thank you so much. Love you. Thank you

Jim Kaspari

for having me on the show.

Janet Fish

All right. Have a good evening. Thank you for listening to the breakaway entrepreneur podcast with Janet Fish. If you liked our show and want more, check us out at www dot breakaway entrepreneur dot com. If you have any questions, please email me at coach at breakaway business coaching dot com. Please put breakaway entrepreneur in the subject line. I’ll answer your questions in an upcoming podcast. Join us next week when we’ll be talking to Dot Boyd about making up for lost time until then, make it a great day.